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Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptors Labeled with [3H]Acetylcholine in Brain: Characterization, Localization and In Vivo Regulation

  • R. D. Schwartz
  • K. J. Kellar
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 30)

Abstract

There is evidence from behavioral (21), electrophysiological (15) and pharmacological (23) studies that mammalian brain contains a type of nicotinic cholinergic receptor.(nAChR). The utility of alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX) for labeling and measuring nAChR in electroplax, skeletal muscle, and certain peripheral neuronal tissues has encouraged similar investigations in the mammalian central nervous system. Although α-BTX binding sites in brain have been extensively characterized in vitro (for review, see 20), the relationship between these binding sites and nAChR is unclear since nicotinic cholinergic drugs are relatively weak competitors for the α-BTX binding sites (16, 24, 30) and the toxin does not appear to block cholinergic function in various neuronal tissues (6, 18).

Keywords

Nicotinic Receptor Scatchard Plot Nicotine Administration Nicotine Treatment Cholinergic Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Schwartz
    • 1
  • K. J. Kellar
    • 2
  1. 1.Section on Molecular Pharmacology Clinical Neuroscience BranchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyGeorgetown University Schools of Medicine and DentistryUSA

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