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Inhibition of Brain Acetylcholine Biosynthesis by Clonidine and Methyldopa: Relevance to Hypertensive Disease

  • J. Buccafusco
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 30)

Abstract

Clonidine and methyldopa are antihypertensive drugs employed widely throughout the world. It is generally agreed that these agents owe their antihypertensive properties to an action within the central nervous system which results in a reduction in central sympathetic drive and a fall in arterial pressure. In this regard, clonidine is approximately 1000 fold more potent than methyldopa. Both drugs, however, can stimulate central alpha-adrenergic receptors, clonidine directly, and methyldopa, through an active metabolite (methylnorepinephrine). It is precisely this property, central alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation, which accounts for their ability to lower arterial pressure in various animal models.

Keywords

Preganglionic Sympathetic Neuron Phrenic Nerve Activity Choline Metabolite Central Cholinergic Neuron Rostral Hypothalamus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Buccafusco
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and ToxicologyAugustaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryMedical College of GeorgiaAugustaUSA
  3. 3.Veterans Administration Medical CenterAugustaUSA

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