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Brain Acetylcholine in Hypertension and Behavior: Studies Using N-(4-Diethylamino-2-Butynyl)-Succinimide

  • H. E. Brezenoff
  • N. Hymowitz
  • W. M. Coram
  • R. Giuliano
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 30)

Abstract

Acetylcholine (ACh) in brain is thought to play a role in a large array of centrally mediated physiological functions. We have been examining central cholinergic involvement in two processes: regulation of blood pressure and schedule-controlled behavior.

Keywords

Muscarinic Receptor Food Pellet Antimuscarinic Drug Reduce Response Rate Antihypertensive Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. E. Brezenoff
    • 1
  • N. Hymowitz
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. M. Coram
    • 1
  • R. Giuliano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyNewarkUSA

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