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Can Central-Venous Replace Mixed-Venous Oxygen Saturation Measurements during Anesthesia?

  • K. Reinhart
  • Th. Kersting
  • U. Föhring
  • M. Schäfer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 200)

Abstract

One of the main goals of perioperative cardiorespiratory monitoring in high-risk patients is to judge to what extent the cardiorespiratory system meets the metabolic demands of the various tissues. Measurements of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SmvO2) have been used to assess the adequacy of tissue oxygenation under various clinical conditions (Valentine et al. 1966, Lee et al. 1972, Divertie et al. 1984). Although SmvO2 depends on a large number of variable factors, including the arteriovenous oxygen content difference and the net effect of the various regional circulations, it is a broad index of the blood-tissue oxygen gradient. In some studies, it was found to be more informative on the actual cardiorespiratory situation and more useful as a prognostic index for patient outcome than the hemodynamic parameters usually measured, like heart rate, blood pressure, etc. (Valentine et al. 1966, Kawakami et al. 1983, Reinhart et al. 1985).

Keywords

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Halothane Anesthesia Regional Circulation Mixed Venous Oxygen Saturation Thoracic Epidural Analgesia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Reinhart
    • 1
  • Th. Kersting
    • 1
  • U. Föhring
    • 1
  • M. Schäfer
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Anesthesia and Operative Intensive CareFree University of BerlinBerlin 45West Germany

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