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Does Contracting Muscle Restore Its Energy Balance Following Severe Hypoxia?

  • C. E. King
  • S. L. Dodd
  • W. N. Stainsby
  • S. M. Cain
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 200)

Abstract

When O2 delivery is reduced during severe hypoxia in resting skeletal muscle, an O2 deficit is incurred. Subsequent restoration of O2 supply to skeletal muscle results in an excess use of O2 by that tissue. Adams and Cain (1983) found that the excess O2 use in recovery was always less than the incurred deficit. They concluded that O2 uptake isused for both energy and non-energy supplying processes and that the excess O2 use in recovery reflected only those energy supply processes that had been curtailed during hypoxia. To see if energy stores depletion is the stimulus for excess O2 use by muscle in recovery, we superimposed hypoxia on the elevated 02 demand of contracting skeletal muscle. We postulated that this would further deplete energy stores and necessitate a greater excess O2 use by muscle during recovery.

Keywords

Gastrocnemius Muscle Creatine Phosphate Severe Hypoxia Contracting Muscle Tension Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. King
    • 1
  • S. L. Dodd
    • 1
  • W. N. Stainsby
    • 2
  • S. M. Cain
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Physiology and BiophysicsUniv. of Alabama at BirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of PhysiologyUniv. of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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