Advertisement

Hepatic Microcirculation in Zucker Fatty Rats

  • Nobuhiro Sato
  • Hiroshi Eguchi
  • Atsuo Inoue
  • Takakatsu Matsumura
  • Sunao Kawano
  • Takenobu Kamada
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 200)

Abstract

The hepatic microcirculatory disturbances play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases.1 Fatty liver is thought to be an initial stage of alcoholic liver injury and is considered to develop into liver fibrosis or cirrhosis.2 However, few quantitative analyses on the microcirculation of fatty liver were reported. Using the in vivo microscopic analyzing system of hepatic microcirculation and the in vivo organ reflectance spectrophotometry, we investigated the microcirculatory changes of fatty liver. This paper describes our method for quantitative analysis of the hepatic microcirculation and describes the pathophysiological role of hepatic microcirculation in context of energy metabolism in fatty liver.

Keywords

Fatty Liver Hepatic Microcirculation Video Tape Recorder Hepatic Oxygen Consumption Erythrocyte Velocity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    A. M. Rappaport, Hepatic microcircuration following intoxications, in: “Toxic injury of the liver, Part A,” E. Farber, and M. M. Fisher, ed., Marcel Dekker Inc, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. Van Waes, and C. S. Lieber, Early perivenular screlosis in alcoholic fatty liver: An index of progressive liver injury, Gastroent. 73: 646 (1977)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. M. Novikoff, Fatty liver induced in Zucker“fatty”(ff) rats by a semisynthetic diet rich in sucrose, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 74: 3038 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    N. Sato, N. Hayashi, S. Kawano, T. Kamada, and H. Abe, Hepatic hemodynamics in patients with chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis as assesed by organ-reflectance spectrophotometry, Gastroent. 84: 611 (1983)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    N. Sato, T. Matsumura, M. Shichiri, T. Kamada, H. Abe, and B. Hagihara, Hemoperfusion, rate of oxygen consumption and redox levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c(+c1) in liver in situ of anesthetized rat measured by reflectance spectrophotometry, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 634: 1 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    K. Aukuland, B. F. Bower, and R. W. Berliner, Measurement of local blood flow with hydrogen gas, Circ. Res. 14: 164 (1964)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    K. K. Cheng, M. S. L. Ho, and Y. P. Ma, The velocity of erythrocytes in a hepatic sinusoid and the effct of intraportal injection of adrenaline, Quart. J. Exp. Physiol. 58: 1 (1973)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    A. Koo, and I. Y. S. Liang, Blood flow in hepatic sinusoids in experimental hemorrhagic shock in the rat, Microvasc. Res. 13: 315 (1977)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    A. Koo, I. Y. S. Liang and K. K. Cheng, Intrahepatic microvascular changes in carbon-tetrachloride induced cirrhotic liver in the rat, Aust. J. Exp. Biol. Med. Sci. 54: 277 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    S. Ohkawa, S. Inoue, K. Tanaka, Y. Takamura, A. Shimizu, and N. Kanizawa, Carbon tetrachloride-induced liver cirrhosis in hypothalamic obesity rats(in Japanese), Acta Hepat. Jap. 26: 668 (1985)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuhiro Sato
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Eguchi
    • 1
  • Atsuo Inoue
    • 1
  • Takakatsu Matsumura
    • 1
  • Sunao Kawano
    • 1
  • Takenobu Kamada
    • 1
  1. 1.The First Department of MedicineOsaka University Medical SchoolFukushima-ku, OsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations