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Relationship between Oxygen Tension and Oxygen Uptake in the Perfused Rat Liver

  • H. Meren
  • T. Matsumura
  • F. C. Kauffman
  • R. G. Thurman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 200)

Abstract

Recently, a method was developed to measure rates of oxygen uptake in periportal and pericentral areas of the hepatic lobule in perfused rat livers (1). This was accomplished by monitoring O2 uptake with miniature O2 electrodes placed on light (periportal) and dark (pericentral) spots on the liver surface. Changes in O2 concentration were measured when the flow was stopped allowing rates of O2 uptake to be calculated (1). Previous studies have demonstrated that rates of O2 uptake were 2- to 3-fold higher in periportal than in pericentral regions of the liver lobule (1,2,3). Hepatocytes in periportal and pericentral zones of the liver lobule differ in their enzyme contents and subcellular structure (4,5,6). Periportal cells contain fewer, larger mitochondria with larger cristae areas, whereas pericentral areas have more, smaller mitochondria (7). The purpose of these studies was to explore mechanisms responsible for different rates of O2 uptake in periportal and pericentral regions of the liver lobule. The results indicate that regional rates of oxygen uptake correlate with local oxygen concentrations.

Keywords

Oxygen Concentration Oxygen Uptake Liver Lobule Hepatic Lobule Perfuse Liver 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Meren
    • 1
  • T. Matsumura
    • 1
  • F. C. Kauffman
    • 2
  • R. G. Thurman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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