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Hepatic Functions in Health and Disease: Implications in Drug Carrier Use

  • Neil McIntyre
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 113)

Abstract

The liver is an unusual organ in that it receives blood not only from the aorta but an even larger amount via the portal vein, the main vein draining the intestine, spleen and pancreas. The arterial blood and portal venous blood mingle within the liver and return to the heart via the hepatic veins and inferior vena cava. The liver receives in total about a quarter of the output of the heart, but only 20–25% of it is arterial blood.

Keywords

Parenchymal Cell Kupffer Cell Portal Tract Chylomicron Remnant LCAT Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neil McIntyre
    • 1
  1. 1.Academic Department of MedicineRoyal Free HospitalLondonUK

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