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Speech Perception in Individuals with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and its Implication for Hearing Loss Criteria

  • Guido F. Smoorenburg
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 111)

Abstract

Assessment of hearing handicap is one of the objectives of audiometry. Regrettably, this objective has received much attention because of the growing incidence of financial claims that should compensate hearing loss due to occupational noise exposure; whereas quantification of the hearing handicap also pertains to evaluation of ear surgery and hearing-aid fitting, to examination of hearing in relation to job requirements, and to adequate provisions for groups with a certain hearing handicap (such as the aged). In this paper, however, we shall address ourselves to the main issue of current interest, the handicap due to noise-induced hearing loss.

Keywords

Hearing Loss Speech Perception Noise Exposure Speech Intelligibility Hearing Handicap 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guido F. Smoorenburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Perception TNOSoesterbergThe Netherlands

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