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Childhood Aggression in the Context of Family Interaction

  • Teru Morton
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

This chapter unfolds on the premise that the family system is the initial, if not primary, context in which childhood aggression can best be understood. Three basic features of family living will be reflected here. First, the family is an arena in which the young infant is inducted into social life and is taught, intentionally or accidentally, a range of social influence strategies, ways in which to influence the enveloping environment—that is, the family. Aggression is one of these modes of social influence. Second, the family is also an arena of conflict, or competing needs and desires, as well as finite resources. Construed in this sense, family members exist in a give-and-take economy wherein they must strike a bargain, each with every other member, about what they are exchanging, what the fair rate of exchange is to be, and how interdependent their existence shall be. This bargaining process thus inherently entails conflict and sometimes also aggression. Third, the family operates as a system; the aggregate of individuals must stay together and yet permit change in individual members and their interdependent relationships.

Keywords

Family Therapy Family System Marital Satisfaction Marital Conflict Family Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teru Morton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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