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Potential Relations between the Development of Social Reasoning and Childhood Aggression

  • Elliot Turiel
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

In this chapter the topic of childhood aggression and violence is considered from a different and more speculative perspective than that of the other contributions to this volume. Whereas all the other contributors have been engaged in research on the sources and nature of aggression or in efforts toward its prevention, my research has dealt primarily with children who are, for the most part, nonaggressive.

Keywords

Moral Judgment Moral Development Social Reasoning Childhood Aggression Social Judgment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elliot Turiel
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Educational Psychology, Department of EducationUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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