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Aggression and Its Correlates over 22 Years

  • Leonard D. Eron
  • L. Rowell Huesmann
  • Eric Dubow
  • Richard Romanoff
  • Patty Warnick Yarmel
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

It is apparent from the varied substance of the chapters in this book that aggression is an overdetermined behavior. There are genetic, constitutional, and environmental factors as well as individual learning history and specific situational events which go into determining whether a person will act in an aggressive manner at any specific time. However, the large number of possible determinants does not mean that aggressive behavior cannot be predicted or explained. Research that my colleagues and I have been doing indicates, in fact, that aggressive behavior is consistent over time and across situations despite the fact that a number of factors contribute to the behavior in varying degrees.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard D. Eron
    • 1
  • L. Rowell Huesmann
    • 1
  • Eric Dubow
    • 1
  • Richard Romanoff
    • 1
  • Patty Warnick Yarmel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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