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Communications Signals and Signal Processing

  • William J. Barksdale
Part of the Applications of Communications Theory book series (ACTH)

Abstract

Computer data communications systems today rely almost entirely on electrical signals to represent the information being conveyed. Such representations may be analog voltages or currents, electromagnetic radio waves, stored electrical charges, digital voltage pulses, or the states of digital electronic gating circuits. Even with lightguide transmission, signals must be converted to and from electrical form at each end of the optical channel for processing and interfacing to the terminal equipment. Thus a solid understanding of electrical signals, filtering, and modulation is a fundamental prerequisite to any meaningful understanding of data communications.

Keywords

Digital Signal Processing Signal Spectrum Communication Signal Digital Modulation Baseband Signal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    E. A. Guillemin, The Mathematics of Circuit Analysis,Wiley, New York (1949), Chap. 7.MATHGoogle Scholar
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    M. E. VanValkenburg, Network Analysis (3rd ed.), Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1974), Chap. 15.Google Scholar
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    J. W. Cooley and J. W. Tukey, An algorithm for the machine calculation of complex Fourier series, Math. Comput. 19, 297–301 (1965).MathSciNetMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    L. R. Rabiner and B. Gold, Theory and Application of Digital Signal Processing, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1975), Chap. 3.Google Scholar
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    A. V. Oppenheim and R. W. Schafer, Digital Signal Processing, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1975).MATHGoogle Scholar
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    IEEE ASSP Digital Signal Processing Committee (ed.), Programs for Digital Signal Processing, IEEE Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. G. R. Cooper and C. D. McGillem, Methods of System and Signal Analysis, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York (1976).Google Scholar
  2. H. Taub and D. L. Schilling, Principles of Communications Systems, McGraw-Hill, New York (1971).Google Scholar
  3. R. E. Ziemer and W. H. Tranter, Principles of Communications, Houghton-Mifflin, Boston (1976).Google Scholar
  4. R. W. Lucky, J. Salz, and E. J. Weldon, Jr., Principles of Data Communications, McGraw-Hill, New York (1968).Google Scholar
  5. G. Daryanani, Principles of Active Network Synthesis and Design, Wiley, New York (1976).Google Scholar
  6. A. V. Oppenheim and R. W. Schafer, Digital Signal Processing, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1975).MATHGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Barksdale
    • 1
  1. 1.South TEC AssociatesHuntsvilleUSA

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