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Housing in People’s Life Cycle

  • Leland S. Burns
  • Leo Grebler
Part of the Environment, Development and Public Policy book series (EDPC)

Abstract

As the household passes through the various stages of its life cycle, housing needs, preferences, and capacity to pay change appreciably. To accommodate change, households typically move from one home to another or they make physical or functional alterations of the unit they occupy. With nearly one-sixth of the population now moving to a different address each year, the typical household may reside in as many as seven different places in the course of its life cycle between the ages of 25 and 70. The change may require not more than moving to a new place on the same street or the far more disruptive transfer from Cincinnati to Los Angeles. Longdistance relocation is often called for by job promotion or the search for a better job or, for many of the unemployed, a job pure and simple. Even in these cases, the life cycle plays an important role since relocation is unevenly distributed over the various age groups of the adult population, being concentrated among the young and middle-aged.

Keywords

Housing Market Household Head Married Couple Baby Boom Life Cycle Stage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leland S. Burns
    • 1
  • Leo Grebler
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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