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The Changing Demographic Base of Housing Demand

  • Leland S. Burns
  • Leo Grebler
Part of the Environment, Development and Public Policy book series (EDPC)

Abstract

This account of demographic forces affecting future housing demand is rendered in three parts. The first focuses on the projected decline in the number of young adults whose increase in the past two decades was a major factor in household formation. The second describes the slowing growth of households, the demand units for housing. The third portrays the continued shift in the composition of households in disfavor of the conjugal family, once the main source of rising demand for housing and especially for home ownership.

Keywords

Housing Market Married Couple Projection Period Housing Demand Household Formation 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leland S. Burns
    • 1
  • Leo Grebler
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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