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Cutaneous Basophil Hypersensitivity

  • Stephen J. Galli
  • Philip W. Askenase

Abstract

The term cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity (CBH) initially referred to a systemic but evanescent pattern of delayed-onset reactivity in guinea pigs sensitized to protein antigens administered without mycobacterial adjuvants (Richerson et al., 1969, 1970; H. Dvorak et al., 1970). When animals immunized in this fashion were skin tested 5–7 days later, sites of antigenic challenge developed intradermal infiltrates containing large numbers of basophilic granulocytes, as well as lymphocytes (H. Dvorak et al., 1970). Although the participation of basophils in certain delayed-onset reactions had been recognized for some time (Rinogoen, 1923; Wolf-Jurgensen, 1965, 1967), the description of CBH focused renewed attention on the occurrence of basophils in delayed-onset immunologic reactions, particularly in the guinea pig. And with the application of improved methods of tissue fixation and processing, basophils soon were discovered in the inflammatory infiltrates elicited by a large number of biologically significant antigens (reviewed in Askenase, 1977, 1980; Galli and Dvorak, 1979; Galli et al., 1983a, 1984).

Keywords

Mast Cell Antigen Challenge Mucosal Mast Cell Delayed Reaction Arthus Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen J. Galli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Philip W. Askenase
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of PathologyBeth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Charles A. Dana Research InstituteBeth Israel HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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