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Characterization of Tachykinin Receptors by Ligand Binding Studies and by Utilization of Conformationally Restricted Tachykinin Analogues

  • Margaret A. Cascieri
  • Gary G. Chicchi
  • Tehming Liang
  • Roger M. Freidinger
  • Christiane Dylion Colton
  • Debra S. Perlow
  • Daniel F. Veber
  • Brian Williams
  • Neil R. Curtis
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

Tachykinins are a family of peptides that share the carboxyl-terminal sequence Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2 and that cause contraction of various smooth muscle systems. Substance P (Chang and Leeman, 1970) and the newly discovered neurokinin A (Maggio et al., 1983; Minamino et al., 1984a; Kimura et al., 1983) and neurokinin B* (Kimura et al., 1983; Kangawa et al., 1983) are mammalian tachykinins. Several nonmammalian tachykinins have been isolated, which include eledoisin, physalaemin, kassinin, and phyllomedusin (for a review, see Erspamer and Melchiorri, 1983). The amino acid sequences of these peptides are shown in Fig. 1.

Keywords

Relative Binding Affinity Tachykinin Receptor Parotid Acinar Cell Cortex Membrane Dohme Research Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret A. Cascieri
    • 1
  • Gary G. Chicchi
    • 1
  • Tehming Liang
    • 1
  • Roger M. Freidinger
    • 2
  • Christiane Dylion Colton
    • 2
  • Debra S. Perlow
    • 2
  • Daniel F. Veber
    • 2
  • Brian Williams
    • 3
  • Neil R. Curtis
    • 3
  1. 1.Merck Sharp and Dohme Research LaboratoriesRahwayUSA
  2. 2.Merck Sharp and Dohme Research LaboratoriesWest PointUSA
  3. 3.Merck Sharp and Dohme Research LaboratoriesNeuroscience Research CentreTerlings ParkUK

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