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Transformation of the Nucleus During Mammalian Spermatogenesis and Fertilization: Implications for Contraceptive Development

  • Anthony R. Bellvé
  • Stuart B. Moss
  • Michael J. Donovan
  • Marion C. Usselman
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

Formation of the mammalian spermatozoon requires the precise temporal synthesis and assembly of many unique polypeptide and glycoprotein constituents. These processes occur primarily, if not exclusively, during meiosis and spermiogenesis6,5, 6 6, while the differentiating germ cells are located within the central compartment of the seminiferous epithelium, behind the Sertoli cell junctions8. The advanced spermatocytes and spermatids, therefore, are excluded from immune surveillance and so many constituents involved in sperm biogenesis are auto-antigenic. These germ cell-specific components provide potential targets for immunological probes designed to act as contraceptive vaccines. The principal questions then reside in: 1 ) identifying suitable antigens with known functions, hence allowing for predictable actions and consequences of the immune vaccination, 2) selecting a mode of delivery and effect that ensures optimal specificity and efficacy, and 3) designing a procedure that allows “normal” expression of physiological and behavioral sex. In the case of male contraceptive vaccines directed against sperm antigens, some level of finesse will be required to abrogate the potential induction and deleterious effects of allergic orchitis. The choice of physiological mechanisms and pathways necessitates an understanding of the structural and functional organization of the mature spermatozoon.

Keywords

Sertoli Cell Nuclear Envelope Sperm Nucleus Male Pronucleus Pronucleus Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony R. Bellvé
    • 1
  • Stuart B. Moss
    • 1
  • Michael J. Donovan
    • 1
  • Marion C. Usselman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Laboratory of Human Reproduction and Reproductive BiologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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