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Active Oxygen and Toxicity

  • Steven D. Aust
  • Craig E. Thomas
  • Lee A. Morehouse
  • Morio Saito
  • John R. Bucher
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 197)

Abstract

Active forms of oxygen are becoming increasingly implicated in the etiology of numerous disease states and the toxicities of various drugs and chemicals. Among the former are the initiation and promotion of tumors (Petkau, 1980) and rheumatoid arthritis (Rowley et al., 1984), while the latter includes toxicities such as that associated with anthracycline antibiotics (Goodman and Hochstein, 1977), and paraquat (Bus et al., 1974). The generation of active oxygen species during normal cellular metabolism such as prostaglandin and leukotriene biosynthesis (Kalyanaraman and Sivarajah, 1984) or by stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes or macrophages (Babior and Peters, 1981) is now widely recognized.

Keywords

Lipid Peroxidation Xanthine Oxidase Phospholipid Liposome Normal Cellular Metabolism Ferritin Iron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven D. Aust
    • 1
  • Craig E. Thomas
    • 1
  • Lee A. Morehouse
    • 1
  • Morio Saito
    • 1
  • John R. Bucher
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for the Study of Active Oxygen in Biology and and MedicineMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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