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The Biosynthesis of LHRH

  • Ann Curtis
  • Roberta Rosie
  • Valerie Lyons
  • George Fink
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

Many small peptides, possessing hormonal or neurotransmitter properties are synthesised as part of large precursor forms which often incorporate the sequences of more than one biologically active molecule. For example, β-preprotachykinin incorporates the sequences of both substance P and substance K (Nawa et al., 1983), and similarly oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin are synthesised within the same precursor molecule as their respective associated proteins, neurophysins I and II (Land et al., 1983). Two common features of precursor molecules which have thus far been identified are the presence of a short hydrophobic signal sequence at the N-terminus and the presence of paired basic amino acids at the boundaries of the active peptide sequences which form cleavage sites for further processing of the large molecules.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Translation Product High Molecular Weight Form Hypothalamic Peptide Hypothalamic Extract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Curtis
    • 1
  • Roberta Rosie
    • 1
  • Valerie Lyons
    • 1
  • George Fink
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Brain Metabolism UnitRoyal Edinburgh HospitalEdinburghUK

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