Neuroendocrine Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease: Raised Plasma Concentrations of Growth Hormone and Thyroid Stimulating Hormone and Reduced Concentrations of Oestrogen-Stimulated Neurophysin

  • J. E. Christie
  • L. J. Whalley
  • J. Bennie
  • H. Dick
  • D. H. R. Blackwood
  • G. Fink
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

The neuropathological (Ishii, 1965) and some of the neurochemical features of Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD) affect not only the cerebral cortex but also subcortical structures including the hypothalamus in which there are reductions in the concentrations of acetylcholine (Davies, 1979), noradrenaline (Yates et al, 1981) and somatostatin (Davies et al, 1982). Somatostatin is also reduced in CSF in patients with ATD (Wood et al, 1982). Acetylcholine, noradrenaline and somatostatin are involved in the control of secretion of pituitary hormones (Reichlin, 1985) and the aim of the present study was to determine whether plasma hormone concentrations would 1) reflect the changes in central neurotransmitters that occur in ATD, and 2) prove useful in the differential diagnosis of ATD from other causes of dementia and from depression.

Keywords

Depression Dopamine Dementia Cortisol Noradrenaline 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. E. Christie
    • 1
  • L. J. Whalley
    • 1
  • J. Bennie
    • 1
  • H. Dick
    • 1
  • D. H. R. Blackwood
    • 1
  • G. Fink
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Brain Metabolism UnitRoyal Edinburgh HospitalEdinburghUK

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