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Neuro-Steroids: 3β-Hydroxy-Δ5-Derivatives in the Rat Brain

  • P. Robel
  • C. Corpéchot
  • C. Clarke
  • A. Groyer
  • M. Synguelakis
  • C. Vourc’h
  • E. E. Baulieu
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

The relationship between steroid hormones and brain function has mostly been considered according to the responses elicited by the secretory products of steroidogenic endocrine glands, generally in the form of feedback control.

Keywords

Fatty Acid Ester Sulfate Ester Trimethylsilyl Ether Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Steroid Sulfate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Robel
    • 1
  • C. Corpéchot
    • 1
  • C. Clarke
    • 1
  • A. Groyer
    • 1
  • M. Synguelakis
    • 1
  • C. Vourc’h
    • 1
  • E. E. Baulieu
    • 1
  1. 1.CNRS ER 125 and INSERM U33. Lab Hormones, Faculté de MédecineBicêtreFrance

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