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Hybridization Histochemistry — Locating Gene Expression

  • J. P. Coghlan
  • P. Aldred
  • A. Butkus
  • R. J. Crawford
  • I. A. Darby
  • J. Haralambidis
  • J. D. Penschow
  • P. J. Roche
  • C. Troiani
  • G. W. Tregear
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

A technique we have called hybridization histochemistry has been developed for the location of specific mRNA populations in specially prepared sections of tissue (Hudson et al 1980; Coghlan et al 1981; Coghlan et al 1984; Hudson et al 1981; Jacobs et al 1983; Coghlan et al 1984). Later the same approach has been used by others to identify specific neurones in the hypothalamus (Gee et al 1983), to study the origin and fate of identified neurones in aphysia (McAllister et al 1983), location of specific genes in Drosophila embryos (McGinnis et al 1984), and enkephalin in the adrenal (Block et al 1984).

Keywords

cDNA Probe Corticotrophin Release Factor Human Calcitonin Hybridization Histochemistry Geiger Counter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Coghlan
    • 1
  • P. Aldred
    • 1
  • A. Butkus
    • 1
  • R. J. Crawford
    • 1
  • I. A. Darby
    • 1
  • J. Haralambidis
    • 1
  • J. D. Penschow
    • 1
  • P. J. Roche
    • 1
  • C. Troiani
    • 1
  • G. W. Tregear
    • 1
  1. 1.Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and MedicineUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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