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Expression of Preprosomatostatin Genes in Heterologous Cells

  • Dennis Shields
  • Reza F. Green
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

The biosynthesis, intracellular transport and posttranslational processing of peptide hormone precursors is a very useful model for investigating cellular and molecular aspects of the secretory pathway. Since the discovery of proinsulin, it is evident that most polypeptide hormones are synthesized as larger precursors. DNA sequencing has established the sequence of numerous hormone and neuropeptide precursors (Douglass et al., 1984), many of which contain the sequences of several bioactive peptides. To generate a biologically active peptide from its precursor, the pro hormone must be proteolytically cleaved and in addition, may undergo several post-translational modifications including glycosylation, sulfation, phosphorylation, amidation and acetylation (Mains, et al., 1983). These reactions occur sequentially as the precursor is transported from the ER to the Golgi apparatus and secretory granules prior to secretion. A major goal of our laboratory is to identify sorting and processing sequences in the precursor to the peptide hormone somatostatin.

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Microsomal Membrane Polypeptide Hormone Heterologous Cell Secretory Apparatus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Shields
    • 1
  • Reza F. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anatomy & Structural Biology and Developmental Biology and CancerAlbert Einstein College of MedicineBronxUSA

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