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Neurohypophysial Peptides in the Gonads

  • B. T. Pickering
  • Sonia D. Birkett
  • H. M. Charlton
  • S. E. F. Guldenaar
  • Helen D. Nicholson
  • P. J. O’Shaughnessy
  • R. W. Swann
  • D. Claire Wathes
  • R. T. S. Worley
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

The first indication that the ovary is a source of oxytocin came from the observations of Ott and Scott in 1910. However, the recent discovery by Wathes and Swann (1982) that ovine corpus luteum contains significant amounts of a substance with the biological, immunoreactive and Chromatographie properties of oxytocin, and the observation by Flint and Sheldrick (1982) that ovarian venous blood contained a higher concentration of the hormone than the arterial supply to the organ, has focussed attention on the presence of ‘neurohypophysial’ peptides in the gonads and their possible roles in reproduction.

Keywords

Leydig Cell Corpus Luteum Seminiferous Tubule Luteal Cell Performic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. T. Pickering
    • 1
  • Sonia D. Birkett
    • 1
  • H. M. Charlton
    • 2
  • S. E. F. Guldenaar
    • 1
  • Helen D. Nicholson
    • 1
  • P. J. O’Shaughnessy
    • 1
  • R. W. Swann
    • 1
  • D. Claire Wathes
    • 1
  • R. T. S. Worley
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Neuronal Peptides Research Group Department of AnatomyUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  2. 2.Department of Human AnatomyUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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