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Voice, Stress, and Emotion

  • Klaus R. Scherer
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

There are two major points that I would like to make in this chapter: first, that voice and speech cues are important yet neglected indicators of stress, and second, that stress should be studied within the general framework of a comprehensive theory of emotion. The order of these two points also reflects the development of research interests and theoretical inclinations in my research group during the past decade. Consequently, in addition to developing arguments for these points, I use the opportunity to describe a series of studies conducted in our laboratory. In doing so, I stress the historical development of this research, since it may illustrate how we came to hold the theoretical views that are presented in this chapter.

Keywords

Emotional State Vocal Tract Emotional Tension Coping Attempt Cognitive Stressor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus R. Scherer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Section de PsychologieUniversité de GenèveGenève 4Switzerland
  2. 2.Justus Liebig UniversitätGiessenFederal Republic of Germany

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