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Note on a Program of Research on Alternative Social Psychological Models of Relationships between Life Stress and Psychopathology

  • Bruce P. Dohrenwend
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Since the turn of the century and up to about 1980, there have been between 80 and 100 studies in which investigators, or teams of investigators, have attempted to count cases of mental disorders in communities all over the world, whether or not the cases located are people who have ever been in treatment with members of the mental health professions (B. P. Dohrenwend & B. S. Dohrenwend, 1982). These epidemiological investigations have been described as “true prevalence” studies, and the cases they have identified consist of disorders that were in evidence at the time of the study regardless of the time of onset. Very few of these studies have involved successive surveys over time. As a consequence, therefore, by and large, they do not provide data on incidence.

Keywords

Life Stress Stressful Life Event Major Life Event Personal Disposition York State Psychiatric Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce P. Dohrenwend
    • 1
  1. 1.New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Social Psychiatry Research Unit, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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