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Phosphorylated Nucleotides and Glycolytic Intermediates in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Rat Uterus in Late Pregnancy

  • I. Zaidise
  • P. J. Geiger
  • D. Boehme
  • S. P. Bessman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 194)

Abstract

Insulin is an anabolic hormone known to stimulate any synthetic pathway (Bessman, 1960). Its mechanism of action is still unknown. Bessman (1954, 1970) suggested that the effect of insulin on energy metabolism is accomplished by coupling the hexokinase reaction to the mitochondria, increasing the effectiveness of glucose conversion to glucose-6-phosphate. The ADP created in the reaction produces an acceptor effect on the mitochondria, increasing the rate of oxidative phosphorylation. Since high energy compounds are rate limiting substrates for anabolic reactions, an increase in supply can enhance all of them. The same argument is also valid for insulin’s favorable effect on membrane transport, also an energy requiring process.

Keywords

Pool Size Synthetic Pathway Glycolytic Intermediate Glucose Conversion Pregnant Uterus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Zaidise
    • 1
  • P. J. Geiger
    • 1
  • D. Boehme
    • 1
  • S. P. Bessman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and NutritionUniversity of Southern California, School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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