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What Can Electrochemistry do ?

  • A. R. Despić

Abstract

The use of electrochemistry seems to be older than electrochemistry itself. In the valley of Mesopotamia, between the Euphrates and the Tigris, in the ruins of some Parthian villages, archeologists have found some 2200 years old remains of what is today popularly called a battery or, technically, a chemical power source of the primary cell type. As seen in Figure 1, it consisted of an iron rod and a copper sheet bent into a cylinder around it, both placed in a ceramic jar filled possibly with grape juice. Its likely use was that of a mysterious driving power source for the process of plating metal objects with gold or silver[1].

Keywords

Electrochemical Machine Cyanogen Bromide Dimensionally Stable Anode Primary Cell Type Tetraethylammonium Hydroxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Despić
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Technology and MetallurgyUniversity of BeogradBeogradYugoslavia

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