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Early Preventive Intervention in Failure to Thrive: Methods and Preliminary Outcome

  • Dennis Drotar
  • Charles A. Malone
  • Linda Devost
  • Corrine Brickell
  • Carole Mantz-Clumpner
  • Judy Negray
  • Mariel Wallace
  • Janice Woychik
  • Betsy Wyatt
  • Debby Eckerle
  • Marcy Bush
  • Mary Ann Finlon
  • Debby El-Amin
  • Michael Nowak
  • Jackie Satola
  • John Pallotta

Abstract

The Infant Growth Project was designed to study the effects of preventive psychosocial intervention on the physical growth and psychological development of infants diagnosed with environmentally-based FTT during a pediatric hospitalization in their first year of life. This chapter describes the evolution of our project and preliminary findings concerning children’s psychological status and physical growth from study intake through 24 months. In this report, emphasis is placed on the pragmatic difficulties involved in conducting research with FTT children and the implications for future research with this high-risk population.

Keywords

Foster Care Head Circumference Insecure Attachment Physical Growth Avoidant Attachment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Drotar
    • 1
  • Charles A. Malone
    • 1
  • Linda Devost
    • 1
  • Corrine Brickell
    • 1
  • Carole Mantz-Clumpner
    • 1
  • Judy Negray
    • 1
  • Mariel Wallace
    • 1
  • Janice Woychik
    • 1
  • Betsy Wyatt
    • 1
  • Debby Eckerle
    • 1
  • Marcy Bush
    • 1
  • Mary Ann Finlon
    • 1
  • Debby El-Amin
    • 1
  • Michael Nowak
    • 1
  • Jackie Satola
    • 1
  • John Pallotta
    • 1
  1. 1.Case Western Reserve University School of MedicineUSA

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