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A Developmental Classification of Feeding Disorders Associated with Failure to Thrive: Diagnosis and Treatment

  • Irene Chatoor
  • Linda Dickson
  • Sharon Schaefer
  • James Egan

Abstract

In 1908 Chapin alerted pediatricians to the failure of growth and development associated with poverty and institutional care of infants and young children. Spitz (1945) gave new importance to Chapin’s observations, demonstrating severe retardation in growth and development in children raised in institutions and in infants between six and twelve months of age whose mothers were abruptly withdrawn. Goldfarb’s (1945) classic studies of the serious developmental disturbances of adolescents who had been raised in institutions added weight to the argument that relative maternal deprivation was a cause of FTT. Several studies have since explored general characteristics of the mother which might play a role in the development of non-organic FTT. Whereas Pollitt, Weisel, & Chan (1975) found that overt pathology was not more likely in FTT mothers than in mothers of normally thriving infants, most authors support the presence of psychosocial problems in FTT mothers (Fraiberg, 1975; Evans, 1972; Drotar, Malone & Negray, 1979).

Keywords

Eating Disorder Esophageal Atresia Speech Development Food Refusal Primary Care Nurse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene Chatoor
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Linda Dickson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sharon Schaefer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • James Egan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryGeorge Washington University School of Medicine and Health SciencesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Social WorkGeorge Washington University School of Medicine and Health SciencesUSA
  3. 3.Children’s Hospital National Medical CenterUSA

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