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A Strategy for Managing Non-Organic Failure to Thrive Based on a Prospective Study of Antecedents

  • William A. AltemeierIII
  • Susan M. O’Connor
  • Kathyrn B. Sherrod
  • Thomas D. Yeager
  • Peter M. Vietze

Abstract

Non-organic failure to thrive (NOFT) is a formidable problem at medical centers that provide care for low income families. The frequency is as high as six percent of all births in these institutions (Altemeier et al., 1985) and the sequelae are substantial for both victims and society. Although we lack an ideal study of outcome (for example, a long term prospective comparison of the full spectrum of NOFT with controls matched for family size, intelligence and socioeconomic level), the best information we have indicates that children with severe NOFT are at risk for delayed development and small stature when examined a decade or longer after the initial diagnosis (Oates et al., 1985).

Keywords

Child Abuse Growth Failure Maternal Feeding Inadequate Weight Gain Social Readjustment Rating Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. AltemeierIII
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Susan M. O’Connor
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kathyrn B. Sherrod
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Thomas D. Yeager
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Peter M. Vietze
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsVanderbilt University HospitalNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, Peabody CollegeVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.Mental Retardation Research CentersNICHHDBethesdaUSA

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