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Comprehensive Pediatric Management of Failure to Thrive: An Interdisciplinary Approach

  • Carol Berkowitz

Abstract

The variety of medical, nutritional and psychosocial causes of FTT necessitate a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of this problem. The utilization of a multidisciplinary team allows each professional to contribute his or her area of expertise to the maximum. This model of care equates FTT with a puzzle, for which each team member obtains one piece. This chapter describes the evaluation process, management strategies, and results of a pediatric clinic established for the assessment of children with FTT.

Keywords

Home Visit Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Foster Mother Foster Home Atrial Septal Defect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol Berkowitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUCLA School of MedicineUSA

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