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Measurement of Oxygen in the Newborn

  • Jose Strauss
  • Anthony V. Beran
  • Rex Baker
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 191)

Abstract

Numerous conditions endanger the life or the health of the newborn baby apparently through decreased or increased oxygen supply to various organs. Shortly after birth cardio-respiratory embarrassment leads to hypoxia and creates the need for increased oxygen concentration in the inspired gas (FIO2). Subsequently, as the baby improves, the need to regulate oxygen intake persists mainly because of the detrimental effects of high oxygen in the environment or in the blood and the dependency on external support of respiration.

Keywords

Electrode Wire Newborn Baby Flow Control Valve Increase Oxygen Concentration Catheter Electrode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jose Strauss
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anthony V. Beran
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rex Baker
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. Ped.U. Miami Med. Sch.MiamiUSA
  2. 2.Dept. Ped., U.C.Calif. Col. of Med.IrvineUSA

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