Blood Cell Aggregation and Pulmonary Embolism

  • John W. Irwin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 191)


The lung is the organ of the mammal in which gas exchanges between inspired air and the blood take place. When an alveolus in a living lung is viewed under magnification of 200X, air and blood appear to be the main components, and the supporting stroma is rather skimpy. Blood flows through the pulmonary microcirculation, which consists of pulmonary arterioles, capillaries, and venules.


Methyl Violet Hamster Cheek Pouch Pulmonary Arteriole Pulmonary Capillary Blood Supporting Stroma 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Irwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary; Massachusetts General Hospital; Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyHarvard UniversityUSA

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