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Hereditary Factors in Neurotic Conditions

  • Steven G. Vandenberg
  • Sandra Manes Singer
  • David L. Pauls

Abstract

Although the clinical utility of the term neurosis has been questioned (see DSM-III, 1980, for a discussion of this issue), an extensive body of psychiatric data has been collected regarding neurotic conditions. Before summarizing the genetic studies in this field, we need to review the terms used in that body of research. A neurosis has usually been defined as a mental abnormality in which there is no serious loss of contact with reality (i. e., there are no hallucinations or delusions), no serious disorganization of personality, and no pervasive change in mood. Rather, the central symptom is thought to be anxiety, which is expressed in a variety of ways, frequently manifested in compulsive or obsessive behavior, difficulty in making decisions, panic attacks, phobias, or conditions characterized by temporary loss of memory. Some neurotics can be difficult to live with because of extremely rigid behavior patterns. They may also be quarrelsome or appear withdrawn, and when this latter symptom is present the condition may be confused with schizoid personality.

Keywords

Mitral Valve Prolapse Hereditary Factor Anxiety Neurosis Neuroticism Scale Neurotic Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven G. Vandenberg
    • 1
  • Sandra Manes Singer
    • 2
  • David L. Pauls
    • 3
  1. 1.University of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.University of Southern IndianaEvansvilleUSA
  3. 3.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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