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Rethinking Equity Theory

A Referent Cognitions Model
  • Robert Folger
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Equity theory (Adams, 1965; Walster, Berscheid, & Walster, 1973) seems to have outlived its usefulness. Can it—should it—be revised or recon-ceptualized? This chapter argues that there is a basis for rethinking equity theory and that such an enterprise is a worthwhile precursor to further research on the psychology of injustice.

Keywords

Social Comparison Procedural Justice Distributive Justice Equity Theory Relative Deprivation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Folger
    • 1
  1. 1.A. B. Freeman School of BusinessTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

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