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Justice Considerations in Interpersonal Conflict

  • Helmut Lamm
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

What role do justice considerations play in interpersonal conflict? Several authors have noted that justice considerations may help conflict resolution. Pruitt (1972), under the heading of “norm following,” delineates how “equity norms” may be used as a “method for resolving differences of interest,” and he also gives attention to the problems with equity norms in the context of conflict resolution. Writing on negotiation as one particular kind of conflict process, Pruitt (1982, pp. 58–64) shows how the availability of a “prominent” solution (that is, one that appears as just to both parties) may facilitate agreement.1

Keywords

Conflict Resolution Distributive Justice Interpersonal Conflict Justice Statement Justice Principle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut Lamm
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für PsychologieUniversität zu KölnKöln 41West Germany

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