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Justice as Fair and Equal Treatment before the Law

The Role of Individual Versus Group Decision Making
  • Siegfried Ludwig Sporer
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Previous research on the psychology of justice has taught us a great deal about various aspects of justice in interpersonal relationships; it has elaborated the guiding principles of justice considerations for small social units, such as dyads and small groups, and for the system as a whole (Brickman, Folger, Goode, & Schul, 1981). It has been concerned primarily with perceptions of fairness, both of participants and outside observers, in a great variety of conditions under which resources may be distributed (i.e., distributive justice; Homans, 1961). Although most researchers have restricted themselves to the study of positive outcomes, some others have brought the allocation of negative outcomes (e.g., in the form of punishment reactions; Miller & Vidmar, 1981) to our attention (see also Hogan & Emler, 1981, on retributive justice).

Keywords

Procedural Justice Retributive Justice Individual Decision Maker Sentencing Decision Procedural Safeguard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siegfried Ludwig Sporer
    • 1
  1. 1.Erziehungswissenschaftliche Fakultät der UniversitätNürnberg 30West Germany

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