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Cooperation, Conflict, and Justice

  • Morton Deutsch
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Recently I completed a book, Distributive Justice: A Social Psychological Perspective (Deutsch, 1985), which could have been entitled “Cooperation, Conflict, and Justice.” These are three of the themes that run throughout the book and that have been the foci of my career as a social psychologist. Here, I would like to present an overview of the work my co-workers and I have done on these themes and to consider the relationship among them.

Keywords

Social Relation Distributive Justice Unpublished Manuscript Teacher College Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morton Deutsch
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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