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Prevention of Environmental Problems

  • E. Scott Geller

Abstract

In its Global 2000 Report to the President, the United States Council on Environmental Quality (USCEQ) offered rather pessimistic projections for environmental conditions through the end of this century. Indeed, similar concerns for the environment and its resources have been voiced by others (e.g., Davis, 1979; Ehrlich, Ehrlich, & Holdren, 1977; Humphrey & Buttel, 1981; Watt, 1982; Welch & Miewald, 1983). Oskamp and Stern (in press) categorized such warnings about current and future ecological stresses into eight target areas: (a) population, (b) food, (c) land, (d) water, (e) energy, (f) solid wastes, (g) minerals, and (h) atmosphere.

Keywords

Behavior Change Behavior Analysis Target Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Behavior Analyst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Scott Geller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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