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Methodological Issues in Prevention

  • Leonard A. Jason
  • David Thompson
  • Thomas Rose

Abstract

This chapter will review methodological issues that need to be considered in designing and implementing preventive-oriented interventions. These concerns are not unique to this chapter, as many of the other contributors to this handbook mention methodological principles. The present chapter, however, more comprehensively and exclusively deals with those experimental and methodological concepts which might guide the planning of preventive projects.

Keywords

Preventive Intervention Methodological Issue Social Competence American Psychologist Coping Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard A. Jason
    • 1
  • David Thompson
    • 1
  • Thomas Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDe Paul UniversityChicagoUSA

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