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Intermediate Filament Diversity as Detected by Antibodies

  • Werner W. Franke
  • Roy A. Quinlan
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 15B)

Abstract

Based on biochemical and immunological properties, 5 cell type-specific iF classes have been identified [1] (each having a central α-helical rod portion flanked by non-α-helical head and tail regions), according to their subunit protein(s): #Ck’s, 2–10/cell (40−68 × 103 apparent mol. wt. by SDS-PAGE) in ep’l and ep’1-derived cells; #Vm (57) in non-ep’l cells, esp. mesenchymal, and in some ep’l cell cultures; #desmin (53) in muscle cells; #GFAP (51) in astrocytes and gliomas; #neurofilament proteins, 3/cell (210, 160 & 68) in neurons and related tumours. Co-localization reflects co-polymerization, with molecular proximity, in two cases (Vm-desmin, Vm-GFAP [2]). PAb’s and MAb’s specific for each iF class are important in histology and especially in tumour diagnosis [3, 4]. There are as many as ~20 Ck’s [5], the set depending on the ep’l type [6] — as exploited in tumour and cell-line typing [7]. By various criteria including antigenic determinants [8], Ck’s fall into 2 groups which each contribute to an iF-assembly pair: type I, acidic; type II, more basic with i.e.p. in 9.5 M urea up to 8 (vs. ~5.5 for all other iF types). Purification of iF’s relies on nonextractability by (e.g.) Triton-X-100. Solubilization of iF proteins needs an agent such as citric or acetic acid, SDS, or buffer rich in urea or guanidine [9,10].

Keywords

Mitotic Cell Interphase Cell MDBK Cell Filament Staining Cytoplasmic Dense Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner W. Franke
    • 1
  • Roy A. Quinlan
    • 1
  1. 1.German Cancer Research CenterInstitute of Cell and Tumor BiologyHeidelbergW. Germany (FRG)

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