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Hormonal Influences on Memory: Interaction of Central and Peripheral Systems

  • James L. McGaugh
  • K. C. Liang
  • M. Catherine Bennett
  • Debra B. Sternberg
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 28)

Abstract

A number of stress-related hormones, including adrenergic catecholamines as well as peptide hormones, have been shown to affect retention when administered to animals after training (de Wied, 1980; Gold and Zornetzer, 1983; McGaugh, 1983). It is well-known that many of the hormones found to affect retention are released from the adrenal medulla and pituitary when animals are given stimulation of the kind typically used in training. In view of this evidence it has seemed reasonable to propose that endogenous hormones released at the time of a learning experience may play an important role in the normal physiology of memory storage (Gold and McGaugh, 1975). According to this view, the susceptibility of memory to posttraining modulating influences serves an important adaptive function: The period of susceptibility allows hormones released by experiences to influence memories of the experiences.

Keywords

Memory Storage Retrograde Amnesia Inhibitory Avoidance Stria Terminalis Adrenergic Antagonist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. McGaugh
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. C. Liang
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Catherine Bennett
    • 1
    • 2
  • Debra B. Sternberg
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and MemoryUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychobiologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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