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Detection Thresholds of Cutaneous Sensations in Health and Disease in Man

  • Peter J. Dyck

Abstract

In considering the mechanisms by which spinal cord systems transfer, modulate, and integrate incoming sensory signals, it is necessary to know something about the location and structure (see Winklemann, Chapter 2) and the properties of the cutaneous and deep receptors that transduce physical and chemical events impinging on them from the external and internal environment (Light and Perl, 1981; Boyd and Smith, 1984; Crago, 1984). As crucial to our understanding of sensory transduction as are the physical and electrophysiological studies of receptors is the information obtained from psychophysical responses evoked by stimuli transduced by these receptors. Cutaneous sensory detection thresholds in man with respect to site, sex, age, and disease are thus the focus of this chapter.

Keywords

Motor Neuron Disease Cutaneous Sensation Hereditary Motor Sensitive Point Vibratory Sensation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Dyck
    • 1
  1. 1.Peripheral Nerve LaboratoryMayo Medical School and FoundationRochesterUSA

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