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An Overview of Similarities and Differences between the Halstead-Reitan and Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Batteries

  • Gerald Goldstein

Abstract

Chapters 6, 7, 8, and 9, provide a review of the relationships between the two major standard neuropsychological test batteries; the Halstead-Reitan (HRB) and the Luria-Nebraska (LNNB). Such a review can serve several purposes. Because the LNNB is a relatively new procedure and the HRB an established one, a high degree of concordance between the two procedures would aid in establishing the concurrent validity of the LNNB. The clinician wishing to do standardized neuropsychological assessment may want to know the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two procedures. Furthermore, the clinician who maintains access to both procedures may require information regarding the type of patient or assessment situation that gives the advantage to one battery over the other. Finally, if both batteries have comparable validity, reliability, and sophistication with regard to the drawing of interpretive inferences, then cost-effectiveness may become an issue, with the more economic procedure becoming the one of choice.

Keywords

Frontal Lobe Neuropsychological Assessment Brain Damage Retrograde Amnesia Frontal Lobe Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Goldstein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and PsychologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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