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Abstract

The systematic assessment of aphasic disability is as old as aphasiology itself. Broca (1861) described a rather detailed testing procedure that must have been routinely employed by clinicians at that time in examining aphasics. In fact, much of the interview with Lalonde, his second patient, is similar to what some clinicians do even today. He began by asking his patient conversational questions, commented on the patient’s speech output and comprehension, and went on to describe his gestures, tested his tongue movements, his writing, and arithmetic. Hughlings Jackson added sign making, writing, comprehension, repetition, reading, and tongue movements, as well as a description of spontaneous speech, as regular features of the aphasia examination. Pierre Marie (1906) emphasized the importance of deficits in comprehension. Moutier (1908), Pierre Marie’s pupil, described a rather complete set of systematic tests for aphasics in his large monograph entitled “L’aphasie de Broca.”

Keywords

Communicative Ability Spontaneous Speech Sentence Completion Speech Output Test Booklet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Kertesz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Neurological SciencesSt. Joseph’s Hospital Research InstituteLondonCanada

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