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Current Directions and Future Trends in Clinical Neuropsychology

  • Theresa Incagnoli

Abstract

The neuropsychological evaluation can be viewed as an extension and quantification of that part of the neurologic examination concerned with higher cortical functions. Luria (1973a) has noted that lesions of the highest zones of the cortex are inaccessible in classical neurological examination. Furthermore, neuropsychological evaluation of cognitive and personality changes may be more sensitive than the neurological exam to early manifestations of brain disease (Reitan, 1976a).

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Head Injury Neuropsychological Assessment Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Brain Damage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theresa Incagnoli
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterNorthportUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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