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Dimorphism in Chrysosporium parvum

  • Milan Hejtmánek

Abstract

The hyphomycetes Chrysosporium parvum var. parvum and C. parvum var. crescens cause a disease called adiaspiromycosis, which is of worldwide distribution. Although it affects primarily the lungs of rodents and other mammals, there are reports, though rare, of its occurrence in man, with only 14 human cases being known (Otčenášek et al., 1982). The first finding of the parasitic (adiasporic) stage of C. parvum var. crescens in a granuloma of the human lung was associated with another principal disease (Doby-Dubois et al., 1964). The definition of disseminated granulomatous pulmonary adiaspiromycosis as a new nosological entity in human medicine is based on a Czechoslovak case (Koďousek et al., 1970b, 1971). The clinical, pathological, and epidemiological aspects of this disease, together with the ecology and geographic distribution of its causative agent, are dealt with in reviews by Jellison (1969), Dvořák et ai (1973), Koďousek (1974), and Otčenášek et al. (1982).

Keywords

Agar Medium Culture Filtrate Spherical Cell Hyphal Cell Medical Mycology 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milan Hejtmánek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Medical FacultyPalacky UniversityOlomoucCzechoslovakia

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