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General Human Health Risks Associated with the Use of Chemicals

  • Larry L. Deaven
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series

Abstract

Health risks to man associated with the use of chemicals include carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, and systems damage. Adverse effects from chemical exposures are determined by the nature and amount of the chemical, the type and length of exposure, and individual susceptibility to the chemical. A series of short- or long-term tests have been devised to predict human risk from suspect chemicals. These tests have provided enough information to establish guidelines for human safety, but they are not capable of providing sufficient information for unequivocal, scientifically valid standards for exposure limits. New methods now under development promise to provide more detailed information on early effects and cumulative damage to individuals. Developing countries should use existing data and regulatory experiences to the greatest possible extent to establish exposure limits according to local needs. When more ideal methods for the detection of chemical damage to man are available, these approaches and the data derived from their use can be incorporated into the programs in developing countries.

Keywords

Chromosome Aberration Sister Chromatid Exchange Human Health Risk Chemical Exposure Health Impact Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry L. Deaven
    • 1
  1. 1.Experimental Pathology Group, LS-4, Life Sciences DivisionLos Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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